Questions About Internships & Summer Experiences

Thinking About Internships
Summer Suggestions
Letters of Recommendation as a Freshman
Funding for Summer Projects
Engineering vs. Volunteering?
PICS Internships
Summer Camp Job
I didn't get an internship... now what?!

 

Thinking About Internships

Question: I hope to spend some time over fall break applying for internships. How do I start?

Answer: Career Services provides a step by step guide for your internship search, and it begins with spending some time just thinking: about yourself, your interests and your goals. Specifically as a pre-health student, consider what you want to gain from your summer: Do you seek hands-on patient care experience to be sure medicine is for you (or to build evidence for med schools that it’s for you)? Exposure to research, to see if you want to pursue it long-term? A chance to address an issue you’re passionate about? Something to do near home, or maybe a chance to see a completely new place? An opportunity to experiment with another field as you decide between health and another interest? Remember that you can always build in some health-related activity in your spare time outside of your primary summer endeavor (e.g., if you’re working in consulting 50-60 hours per week, volunteer at a hospital or clinic for a couple of shifts in the evenings or weekends). Once you’ve thought more about what you might want, start doing some online searching, cast your net widely, use the HPA clinical and research web pages, and keep good notes on deadlines and requirements so that you’ll be able to create an action plan on what applications to do when.


Summer Suggestions

Question: I’m a freshman pre-med student and I’m wondering what I should do this summer. I’ve already done hospital volunteering in High School. Should I work in a lab?

Answer: There’s no one way to answer the question of what you “should” do this summer. Instead, we might ask you to think about what would you enjoy doing? What would give you a new and different kind of experience from what you have done in the past? What would help you develop interpersonal skills and an ethic of service? What would allow you to recharge your batteries? While your high school volunteer experience may have been helpful in your decision to pursue the pre-health path, it will be important to continue to develop clinical exposure (either as a volunteer, or by shadowing physicians) in order to enhance your own understanding of what it means to practice medicine, and in order to convey to a medical school that you have deepened your engagement throughout your college years. You may choose to gain more clinical exposure in the summer, but you may prefer to do this during the academic year, and do something entirely different during the summer. Doing benchwork in a lab prior to medical school is certainly not essential (unless you are pursuing an MD/PhD). If you are passionate about lab work and want to pursue it, that’s fine. But don’t spend your summer in lab because you think you “should.” No matter what you want to do this summer, start thinking about it now if you haven’t already. Be sure to check our Summer Clinical and Research pages for ideas about summer experiences. And, if you do something great that’s not on our list yet, by all means let us know! 


Finding a Summer 'Internship'

Question:  I am a freshman and I just want to make sure I don’t miss the chance to find an internship for the summer. I don’t see specific internships listed on the HPA website. Am I missing something? Can you give me advice about where to look and what kinds of internships are a good idea to consider?

Answer: Any internships we hear about are posted in our Vitals newsletter, so be sure to contact us if you'd like to subscribe! We also list them in a separate Summer Opportunities page. In addition to Vitals, be sure to check Hire Tigers, the Career Services online system for current postings of all internships as well as full-time jobs. We encourage pre-health students to become familiar with the Career Services website, including the page devoted to finding internships and guidance on finding alumni who might be willing to host you as an intern, or give advice about where you might look. In addition, we provide links to organizations where Princeton pre-health students have interned over the years in the Pre-Health Prep section of our website (both clinical and research opportunities). These may or may not have current opportunities at any given time, but we encourage you to learn about these and similar organizations at home and abroad, and check on what might be available if you are interested. Of course, not every internship you do as a pre-health student needs to be specifically health-related. You can also gain valuable service, leadership, teaching, and research experience—or pursue other talents-- that will be relevant for a future in the health professions. Internships are one great way to gain exposure to medicine, but just don’t forget about shadowing, volunteering during the summer and/or the academic year, coming to “The Doctor Is In” and other presentations, and just keeping an eye on healthcare in the news. Good luck! 


Letters of Recommendation as a Freshman

Question: I’m a freshman and I’m applying to internships that require letters of recommendation, but I haven’t gotten to know my science professors well at all. Can I use letters from high school? Can I ask my writing sem or freshman sem prof even though they aren’t in sciences? How about preceptors? Are there other people I should ask?

Answer: The answer is going to vary depending on the internship(s) that you’re applying for. Check to see if this is addressed on their website (usually in application procedures or an FAQ page). If not, it’s fine to contact the program directly. Some internships require college letters but others will accept high school letters; some would strongly prefer science letters while others aren’t as strict – best to get in touch with them individually and see what they say. If they do not prefer science references, then we would recommend choosing faculty or preceptors who have gotten to know you well. Generally, letters from preceptors/TAs are going to be fine – any postdoc or doctoral candidate at the University who instructs our undergrads is a fine recommender. Sometimes a preceptor will co-sign their letter with the primary professor of the course – this is fine, but not required. By the time you’re applying to professional school, we will expect that you’ve gotten to know at least some of your faculty well, but as a newer student, it’s understandable that you haven’t been able to do so yet. Even so, we’d recommend that you start making a point of getting to know faculty via office hours, informal meetings, etc. – the more you practice now, the easier it will be as you progress through your academic career. 


Funding for Summer Projects

Question:  Dear HPA, I am planning on doing research this summer outside my area of concentration (and thus totally unrelated to my thesis/independent work at Princeton). I was wondering if you know of any grants or scholarships that Princeton offers for undergrads doing mentored summer research over the summer, not necessarily for our thesis or independent work.

Answer: The question of funding your summer ambitions is a great one. There is no one resource, but rather many potential ones. While this doesn’t apply to you, it is good to know that our Financial Aid office in West College is sometimes able to fund coursework taken elsewhere over the summer. For other projects—research, service, clinical work—pre-med students should seek funding from a relevant academic department, although not necessarily the one of your chosen concentration (this depends on the nature of your idea). Another option for funding might come through various Classes via the Alumni Council, or perhaps through the Center for Religious Life or the Office of the Vice President of Campus Life - use the Student Activities Funding Engine to identify possible sources.  Our advice to you specifically would be to contact the academic department that is most relevant to the research you’re going to do; we wouldn’t assume that nothing would be available to you only because you’re not concentrating in that department, as there might be a faculty member on campus very interested in your ideas. 


Engineering vs. volunteering this summer?

Question: I’m a freshman and I’m thinking about engineering and medicine as my top career options right now. Is it better to take an internship in engineering, or to do some shadowing and hospital volunteer work over the summer?

Answer: Why not do both? The Princeton summer is a luxurious twelve weeks, which means that you have more time than many of your peers at other schools to engage in numerous activities. Many internships last eight to ten weeks, which would still leave time to do some full-time shadowing. It may be worthwhile to let your internship supervisor know that you’re considering a medical career, and see if they have any contacts who you could shadow or know of nearby places where you could volunteer. Once you know your internship site, you can also start googling for nearby hospitals and see if you can do a weekend volunteer shift, an evening EMT training class, spend time at an animal shelter, or take part in a similar endeavor that doesn’t take up too much time. Remember, internships are usually about forty hours a week, so that leaves 128 hours of time – even after adding in commuting, meals, sleep and socializing, you should be able to spare a few hours to gain some medically-relevant experience.


PICS Internships

Question:  Hi HPA – I am a freshman and I am trying to make plans for this summer. I want to remain in the states and I’d really like to get some clinical exposure, and maybe have a chance to do some clinical research. I don’t have enough money to pay for housing to be out of my hometown… Are there any domestic Princeton programs or resources that you can recommend?

Answer: In the fall semester, the PICS (Princeton Internships in Civic Service) opportunities are announced. In 2012, among the offerings were 23 different paid internships in 13 hospitals or medical/health policy organizations! A PICS internship will have you working closely with terrific physicians and healthcare teams, with alumni as your mentors. Details about each organization and position are posted on the PICS website. The PICS Application is due in January. Keep in mind that non-clinical, and non-health related PICS opportunities can also be relevant and meaningful pre-health experiences. After all, medicine is about being in the service of others, so getting experience working in these kinds of settings can help you to develop your helping skills, empathy, and leadership potential. Of course PICS is just one option for getting clinical experience. You can also always feel free to use the HPA Physician Shadowing List, the Tigernet Alumni Directory, or contact physicians or other healthcare professionals, or hospital volunteer offices close to home. 


Summer Camp Job

Question:  I am a pre-med freshman. I know it is suggested that we do medically-related summer programs, but is it absolutely necessary the summer after freshman year? I love kids, and would love to work at a camp this summer, especially since it will probably be the last summer that I would be able to do this. Would this be discouraged? Should I try to volunteer at a hospital or something like that at the same time?

Answer:  Go ahead and work at the summer camp. It’s nice to love kids! Medical schools think so, too. Maybe you could hang out with the camp nurse a bit? Some people do their medically-related activity during the academic year instead of the summers. Do what works best for you. 


I didn't get an internship ... now what?!

Question: I'm a freshman and applied to a few internships, but didn’t get any of them, and now I don’t know what to do this summer. Help! 

Answer: First of all, don’t despair – we’re glad that you put yourself out there as an applicant. The process of finding internships, crafting your resume and cover letter, asking for letters of recommendation – all of this is great practice for future applications, and will give you a head start in future years, when you’ll have more experience under your belt as an internship applicant.

Many students encounter this issue, especially in freshman and sophomore summers. This is a good time to turn to your personal/family network: do you have friends’ parents who are physicians, or friends of physicians? This could be a good excuse to visit a roommate or Princeton friend for a couple of weeks over the summer, hang out with them at night, and go to work with their parent during the day. Did you work in a lab in high school? Maybe your supervisor has some connections that will help you find a new opportunity, or some colleges or universities that they might recommend where similar work is being done – we’ve had students find research opportunities just by writing professional emails and attaching their resumes, and sending this information to researchers in fields of interest. Don’t forget to use the Princeton network: reach out to alumni who might be in your area, and see if they’re willing to have you shadow, or maybe even assist on a research project, if they’re in a lab. Use the Career Services Networking Techniques to make contact with alums. Also, don’t limit yourself to learning about medical careers in the summer. Maybe you’re still considering interests from high school, or maybe you’ve discovered something new through your courses and activities here – now is the time to explore! If you’re still trying to decide whether you’d rather be, say, an engineer or a doctor, reach out to some engineers and do some shadowing with them, too. 

Many hospitals also have summer volunteer programs for college students – we’re starting to compile a list of links of hospital volunteer websites. If you’d like some help locating hospitals in your area, email us and we’ll do some scouting near your home town. If you don’t have access to a hospital, consider other ways that you can show your dedication to your community, and improve your cultural competence (exposure to people different from yourself) through volunteering – working with veterans, the elderly, people with disabilities, people who are homeless – there are many sectors of society that you will be serving as a physician, so gaining an appreciation of their experiences on a personal level now can help you think about your career in the future.

We also encourage you to revisit the Question of the Week: “What pre-health things can I do during Fall Break while I have some free time” – many of these things also apply to Spring and Summer breaks!